The Senecayuga Chronicles

Owner, Carmelo “Mel” Russo, writes articles about the Seneca and Cayuga lakes and surrounding area.


 

 

Fish Species Present in 1909 (According to Reed and Wright)

Fish Species Present in 1909 (According to Reed and Wright)

By Carmelo "Mel" Russo Fish Species Present in 1909 (According to Reed and Wright) Petromyzontidae (the lampreys) Sea lamprey Brook lamprey (non parasitic) Acipenseridae (sturgeons) Lake sturgeon Lepisosteidae (gars) Long-nosed gar Amiidae (bowfins) Bowfin Ictaluridae ...
The Lake Sturgeon (Acepenser fulvescens)

The Lake Sturgeon (Acepenser fulvescens)

By Carmelo "Mel" Russo This year, two different friends of mine have seen two different specimens of sturgeon in Cayuga Lake. Unfortunately, both fish were dead. Although  indigenous and once abundant in Cayuga Lake, Seneca ...
The Cayuga-Seneca Canal

The Cayuga-Seneca Canal

By Carmelo "Mel" Russo A unique feature of Seneca Lake and Cayuga Lake is the splendid canal which connects the two largest Finger Lakes. This amazing engineering feat of its time not only links the ...
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Land, A Most Valuable Resource

By Carmelo "Mel" Russo The Malthusian Theory, originating in the late 18th century, appears to be on hold, temporarily in time, because of some circumstances unforeseen by the English economist. The popular theory predicted that ...
The Longnose Gar (Lepisosteus osseus)

The Longnose Gar (Lepisosteus osseus)

By Carmelo "Mel" Russo The gar is an infrequently encountered scary looking fish found commonly in many of the Finger Lakes. Originally colonizing the Great Lakes Basin approximately 10,000 years ago via ancient connections with ...
The Slimy Sculpin (Cottus cognatus)

The Slimy Sculpin (Cottus cognatus)

(Percopsis omiscomaycus) By Carmelo "Mel" Russo The eastern slimy sculpin (family Cottidae) is a little known tiny, thumb-shaped fish, not exceeding four inches in length, that commonly inhabits the shallows of our Finger Lakes. It ...
The Troutperch

The Troutperch

(Percopsis omiscomaycus) By Carmelo "Mel" Russo The troutperch is a small, spotted fish rarely exceeding 5 inches in length. It frequents the shoals and mouths of streams in the Finger Lakes area. The creature is ...
The Magic of Water

The Magic of Water

By Carmelo "Mel" Russo HOH Water is a polar molecule. It has a partially negative pole at the oxygen end, and two partially positive poles at each of the hydrogen ends. This polarity of the ...
The Finger Lakes in Perspective

The Finger Lakes in Perspective

by Carmelo “Mel” Russo Some of us would like to think that we live around the best, or maybe the biggest, or perhaps the deepest, or possibly the longest Finger Lake. Sometimes when we think ...
Protect Our Lakes!

Protect Our Lakes!

by Carmelo "Mel" Russo Recently, much discussion has been circulating regarding LP gas (liquified petroleum gas or propane) storage in the salt caverns along the shores of Seneca Lake. Any attempt to originate such an ...
Frontenac Island - The Original Allure of the Finger Lakes Region

Frontenac Island – The Original Allure of the Finger Lakes Region

By Carmelo "Mel" Russo Today, people come to the Finger Lakes area to gaze at its unequivocal, scenic beauty and its wealth of both civilized and natural history. In addition, they come for a pleasing ...
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What is a “Bloom” on Our Finger Lakes?

By Carmelo "Mel" Russo Recently, much news has surfaced (no pun intended) about blooms on Seneca Lake. There are usually blooms on both Seneca and Cayuga Lake each summer. A “bloom” is a visible manifestation ...
Cayuga Lake

Cayuga Lake

By Carmelo "Mel" Russo Cayuga Lake is located in the center of the eleven Finger Lakes of upstate New York. It is 40 miles long and has a maximum width of 3.5 miles. Because of ...
Will Our Lakes Freeze Over Completely?

Will Our Lakes Freeze Over Completely?

By Carmelo "Mel" Russo When the temperature gets this cold for several weeks, there is always talk of Seneca and/or Cayuga Lake freezing over completely. Old timers talk of car races on the ice of ...
The High Level Finger Lakes

The High Level Finger Lakes

By Carmelo "Mel" Russo Following and during the recession of the last glacier over 10,000 years ago, the level of Seneca and Cayuga Lakes was much higher than their present elevation. Blocked by the protruding ...
The Cayuga-Seneca Canal

The Cayuga-Seneca Canal

By Carmelo "Mel" Russo A unique feature of Seneca Lake and Cayuga Lake is the splendid canal which connects the two largest Finger Lakes. This amazing engineering feat not only links the two lakes to ...
About Seneca Lake

About Seneca Lake

By Carmelo "Mel" Russo Seneca lake is located in the geographic center of the eleven Finger Lakes and it is the deepest of the group. Moreover, it is exceedingly deep throughout much of its 70 ...
Putting it All Into Perspective

Putting it All Into Perspective

By Carmelo "Mel" Russo Some of us like to think that we live around the best, or maybe the biggest, or perhaps the deepest, or possibly the longest lake. Sometimes when we think we're in ...
The American Eel (Anguilla rostrata)

The American Eel (Anguilla rostrata)

By Carmelo "Mel" Russo The American eel is a less than common inhabitant of Seneca and Cayuga Lakes. These eels have true jaws and teeth, and are the most voracious of fresh water predators. The ...
The Invasion of the Gobyfish(Family Gobiidae)

The Invasion of the Gobyfish(Family Gobiidae)

By Carmelo "Mel" Russo In very recent times, an exotic fish, new to the Finger Lakes has made headlines. The nuisance newcomer is the round goby (Neogobius melanostomus). The species, which is native to the ...
The Finger Lakes Whitefishes

The Finger Lakes Whitefishes

By Carmelo "Mel" Russo Little is known about the existence of whitefish (subfamily Corigoninae) in Seneca and Cayuga Lakes. The 1970 edition of Hubbs and Lagler, key to northeastern freshwater fishes, lists a particular kind ...
A Tale of the Origin of the Fish Species of Cayuga and Seneca Lakes

A Tale of the Origin of the Fish Species of Cayuga and Seneca Lakes

Our story begins at an unreasonable point in time, some 550 million years ago when what is now New York State was at the bottom of an epicontinental sea.   Gradually, the entire state, along with ...